Dismiss Notice

Hi, we hope you enjoy looking around New Rider. We are a very friendly board so don't feel afraid to ask your questions. Register now, say 'Hello' and join in the conversations.

Winter turn out pad.

Discussion in 'Ringside Chat' started by tiamaria lady, Oct 11, 2017.

  1. tiamaria lady

    tiamaria lady Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2010
    Messages:
    192
    Likes Received:
    55
    This is my first winter having a turnout area with sand. I just want to get advice on how you would use it. I know it's self explanatory bit what I mean is how long would you turn your horse out on it for? Would you keep giving regular haynets? Or pop them out for an hour and back in stable. She gets out on a hack alright but don't have too far to go where I am. I want to mind my paddocks and am so confused. Please help. I feel silly :oops:
    Last few yrs she was in livery.
     
  2. mystiquemalaika

    mystiquemalaika Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    3,737
    Likes Received:
    1,210
    Id have them out aslong as possible with haynets hanging around the paddock for some movement as well. Poo pick daily and no reason you shouldnt be able to keep it nice but still allow them as much time out of the stable as they can have :)
     
  3. newforest

    newforest Opinion, a view not always based on knowledge.

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2008
    Messages:
    23,381
    Likes Received:
    7,729
    How much land have you got is the first question. If it's two acres, you could put a track around around the edge of both and use the centre for autumn and winter.
    Possibly link to the sand area so they have a choice?
     
    tiamaria lady and Kite_Rider like this.
  4. Advert Guest Advertisement



    to hide this advert.
  5. Jessey

    Jessey Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2004
    Messages:
    16,112
    Likes Received:
    7,000
    Another vote for out as long as possible with hay, def don't feed off the floor though and be careful to pick up what has been dropped as sand colic is a real thing.
     
  6. Trewsers

    Trewsers Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2004
    Messages:
    47,035
    Likes Received:
    7,529
    This totally^^^
     
    tiamaria lady likes this.
  7. Jane&Ziggy

    Jane&Ziggy Learning together!

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2010
    Messages:
    15,783
    Likes Received:
    4,005
    I agree with everyone else. Keep them out for as long as is feasible, and on the grass as much as you can. I second using a track, they are brilliant.
     
    tiamaria lady and Kite_Rider like this.
  8. tiamaria lady

    tiamaria lady Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2010
    Messages:
    192
    Likes Received:
    55
    Thanks for your replies :) @ Jessy regarding the sand colic....thats something I only realised in last few weeks that it was a serious enough problem with sand. I wish I had known sooner. Now I'm nearly afraid to turn her out on it at all. I like the sound of the track. I never in a thousand years would have thought of that :rolleyes: going to get started on one at the weekend.
     
    Jessey and Trewsers like this.
  9. Jessey

    Jessey Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2004
    Messages:
    16,112
    Likes Received:
    7,000
    I knew nothing of it before I moved to the brecks where we have very sandy soil (I'd had horses for 20 years prior), take a few simple precautions and you're as likely to avoid it as any other type of colic so don't not use your lovely all weather turn out because of it, but it is important to be aware of it :) We just don't feed off bare sand/the floor, clean up what they drop so they aren't tempted to, avoid bucket feeds on it especially if they tend to drop their food out of the bucket (again so they aren't tempted to clean it up), if they start to get watery poop then test for sand in the gut, and feed a dose of psyllium once in a while :)
     
The FREE site for selling smallholdings, farms and rural properties
Loading...

Share This Page