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Strong pony who won't soften!!

Discussion in 'Older Riders' started by Equiste, Oct 10, 2017.

  1. Equiste

    Equiste New Member

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    I have a welsh sec B. I've owned for 7 years. He's only been brought back into work properly the last two years because of the fact he kept bolting and I was to young and weak to hold him. Anyway this summer has been amazing and we have achieved so much. Hiwever, the last two months we've been having some serious difficulties. I can't physically give with my reins because he runs off. I try half halts all the time but he doesn't listen, the second I give with my reins in the trot he bolts off.. and the same with canter. I've tried two different bits, continuous half halts, a flash. The only way I can stop him is by holding him back and I know that's wrong and causes him to over end but there's nothing else I can physically do
     
  2. newforest

    newforest Opinion, a view not always based on knowledge.

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    I would get hold of an instructor after you have done a top to toe check.
    Teeth, saddle, physio to rule out the running being because they are in pain.


    However if you were only 8 when your parents bought this pony, why didn't they enlist in lessons for you, or sell if unsuitable.
     
    carthorse and mystiquemalaika like this.
  3. tikkitti

    tikkitti Well-Known Member

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    Have him checked over and also maybe someone watch him from the floor, is he putting his tongue over the bit possibly? Our darty used to but a simple change to a ported bit changed that eg: a magic snaffle or kimblewick. We have never had the issue since and she has good brakes now. x
     
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  5. Equiste

    Equiste New Member

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    They tried to sell but I cried for hours on end bevause on the ground we had the best bond ever. And they tried lessons but he was physically too much we've been through all sorts, I've been in barbed wire and completely cut my self to pieces, trampled on. But like I say he was amazing these last couple years it's just recently
     
  6. domane

    domane Chatterbox

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    What's he like on the lunge? And long-lining? Does he still run off, or is it just when ridden?
     
  7. Equiste

    Equiste New Member

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    On the lunge he is absolutely amazing! Listens to voice command and doesn't run off at all
     
  8. Jessey

    Jessey Well-Known Member

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    If there is a sudden change it is normally something that has changed (rather than just the nature of the pony), have a really hard think back about what changed a few months ago, did you change feeds? put him in a new field? get a new bridle/saddle/numnah? etc., if there is nothing you can think of so that you can switch back to see if the problem disappears I would get tack, back and teeth checked and possibly a full vet MOT to eliminate any pain issues.

    If you get the all clear from all of those perhaps try not holding him back all the time, but instead turn him tightly every time he tries to rush forwards, this could take months of repetition in the school and you will have to stop doing all the fun things while he learns not to rush off, if you go back to holding him just once it would undo all the good work. First do it in halt, if he tries to walk make a tight 90 degree turn (turn on the forehand type tight) and RELEASE until you can mount and sit there without holding him back, only once you can do this for at least a minute and wriggle about in the saddle a bit without holding on should you try doing the same in walk. Once in walk, repeat with a slightly less tight turn but still 90 degrees then release, until he can walk several laps of the school/field without trying to rush. Initially you might do a turn, 1 step, a turn, 1 step and so on, round and round, he will get bored of that and gradually give you more steps nicely in between. Once walk is 100% perfect and he does that same perfect walk every time you get on without having to remind him, only then progress to trot.
     
    #7 Jessey, Oct 11, 2017
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2017
    squidsin likes this.
  9. squidsin

    squidsin Well-Known Member

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    It could be that his shape has changed and he's got slimmer with exercise or conversely, fatter with the rich grass we've had this year, and his saddle no longer fits and is making him sore. If he's suddenly started rushing off, it does sound like a pain issue as horses run away from pain. I'd get the vet and saddler out and get him checked over.
     
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  10. Lemme

    Lemme Well-Known Member

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    I would get him checked over, your experience sounds very similar to that of Charlie (WelshA) , my daughter who is in her 40's attempted to back him twice - the first time successful but ended badly with a spook which resulted in my daughter being injured and him out of work for 6 months, then due to other health issues when my daughter came to restart him last year she did all the ground work again - perfect manners- responsive a darling - tack on no problem, got on him for literaly the time it took for bum to touch saddle to find herself planted in the floor again - usual advice - he's just being a Welsh , trying it on- gut told us No - a Welsh is often excitable/cheeky but this was something else, downright dangerous, long story short, thermal image and back lady later - he had 2 hips out and a very sore back- looking back we can almost pinpoint from a field incident we thought it was our Shetland but looks like it was him or both - 9 months on he is getting there - we hope to reback next year - although doubt daughter will do the honours after two lots of whiplash and badly strained wrist if we go that route we will take advice and go with a pro, he really is too good to be a field ornament but we do have options for inhand showing with him.

    They are very good at hiding injury until they are put in a situation where they cannot - in our case the extreme pain of being Sat on even for less than a few seconds - just pleased we went with our gut and didn't try to persevere.
     
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