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Registered Irish Draught Cork Arthur

Discussion in 'Breeds, Colouring and Genetics' started by greenb, Mar 2, 2017.

  1. greenb

    greenb New Member

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    I'm trying to find out more information on RID Cork Arthur as he is the sire of my Irish Draught Horse Mister Flynn.
    Flynn is a lovely but very lazy boy and I'm really trying to find out about more about his breeding line.
    I've not had an Irish Draught before so I'm not used to this breed at all. I'm more interested in temperament than anything as I guess I'm a happy hacker at heart.
    Flynn could be quite talented if he put more effort in but I guess he just doesn't see the point. He does have a big jump in him but prefers to minimise any effort, and he sometimes just completely ignores my leg which drives me to distraction. I'm guessing that these are fairly common traits in the breed?
     
  2. carthorse

    carthorse Well-Known Member

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    The big jump is a common trait, as is the tendency to ignore rider/handler if they think they no better & the rider can't prove otherwise. They're a lovely breed but do tend to have opinions! They aren't all lazy, indeed some are quite the opposite & make you realise you have an awful lot of horse under you & are riding by their tolerance alone! Mine was also incredibly intelligent & as he grew up hacking wasn't enough to keep his mind occupied, though I've also known some who aren't clever & will bumble around doing the same thing day in day out.

    Overall they are a very kind, generous & loving breed. I've known a lot of them over the years & I've never known a nasty one.
     
  3. greenb

    greenb New Member

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    Thanks for the reply.
    It has taken me 4 years to get him forward but he does slip back now and then which can be very frustrating. He's great in traffic but if a sheep looks at him funny he turns tail and runs away. I've felt the power you've mentioned and it's wonderful just wish I saw more of it. He's now 8 so probably just about fully mature and is a real character. Another thing I like is he's very trainable and
    once he's got something he doesn't forget even with a break inbetween. His walk to canter transitions are to die for, turn on the haunches pretty good but leg yielding oh go on then must I?
    Lots to like but infuriating at times, my instructor just laughs and says give it time it will come
     
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  5. carthorse

    carthorse Well-Known Member

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    Probably no consolation but I do think something that's naturally not forward is easier than something always looking to go when you're looking at the size & power of a good ID. Mine was my horse of a lifetime but it could be very difficult trying to contain him, "wait" seemed to be in constant use & all that energy had to be channelled or there'd be an explosion. He learned extremely quickly, both the good & the bad, & he taught me more than I ever taught him. I miss him terribly.

    I remember many many years ago a breeder who sold a lot of her ID stock as hunters saying "a decent hunter will get you out of trouble, a good one won't let you get into trouble" - sounds good until you realise that you're just there for decoration! She bred good hunters, & part of the reason I never hunted Jim is I'd have had no control & he'd have been in front of the fox!!! Probably without me since I have little doubt I'd have been bucked off the first time I tried to steady him or landed even slightly off balance.

    I meant to say before that I don't know anything about Cork Arthur stock, but the IDHS(GB) site has a forum page where you could ask.
     
  6. greenb

    greenb New Member

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    I learnt the hard way about channelling the energy. I'd had him for about 6 weeks and took him to the local show and he just exploded rearing straight up and bucking like a proper bronco, (managed to stay on phew!) All my fault. I tried to make him stand still and all that energy had no where to go lesson learnt.
    He's a mess at shows can't bear to be away from his stable mate it's as if a switch in his brain has flipped and my quiet plod turns into a highly strung TB that's away with the fairies
    Thanks for the suggestion about the IDHS forum I'll give that a try.
     
  7. newforest

    newforest Opinion, a view not always based on knowledge.

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    My friend had an ID a safe as houses and yes a little on the lazy side.
    But surely any horse can be like that?

    Mine is Irish on dad's side and yes I would say she is placid and less is more, but that's her and not because of her breeding.
    Her mum is very mellow.

    I have known very laid back tbs too laid back to bother racing.
     
  8. greenb

    greenb New Member

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    Of course absolutely I hadn't meant to blame his breeding entirely for his laziness
    I'm interested in his sires temperament from all aspects.
    My boy is lazy but a lovely gentle but cheeky soul as well and then there is the hysterical side I see as shows which caught me completely by surprise as mentioned above I hadn't seen that side of his nature before. 4 years on I think I know him now.
     
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