Dismiss Notice

Hi, we hope you enjoy looking around New Rider. We are a very friendly board so don't feel afraid to ask your questions. Register now, say 'Hello' and join in the conversations.

I need a confidence boost fast!

Discussion in 'Confidence Club' started by Paige, Apr 19, 2017.

  1. Paige

    Paige New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2017
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    So a few days ago I bought a 3 year old pony and I've been having problems with her. One being that the keeps on rearing all the time on the lead and is becoming quite dangerous with it, today she ended up hitting me and it's put a real dent in my confidence. What can I do to stop her from doing this? Or is there anyone that has experienced anything like this?
    I would say prior to this I have been very very confident but now it's put a massive dent in my confidence and I'm worried now when I handle her!
     
  2. CharliesAngel

    CharliesAngel Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2010
    Messages:
    1,070
    Likes Received:
    923
    prior to this you have been very confident with what - previous ponies / horses you have owned?
     
  3. Skib

    Skib Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2003
    Messages:
    7,002
    Likes Received:
    953
    Horses have to be taught to be led. And taught to comply with humans leading them. This is often done when they are very young with their mother - I have seen it done by a trainer. Young horses are then often turned away in a herd so they spend their second /third year learning to respect the status of their elders in the herd.
    A horse that has been kept on its own or been mostly with people may not have had this early conditioning in a herd. And then may be more difficult for a human to train to comply. With a three year old it probably has more to do with the history of the young horse until now than it does with your confidence. But if you are unable to teach this horse ground manners or lead it safely, you really need professional help. Learning to lead nicely is one of the first lessons a young horse is taught and must learn. Because if you cant lead it safely, you cant start other ground work.
     
    Trewsers likes this.
  4. Advert Guest Advertisement



    to hide this advert.
  5. Trewsers

    Trewsers Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2004
    Messages:
    46,462
    Likes Received:
    6,990
    Can you tell us a bit more about yourself?
     
  6. carthorse

    carthorse Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2006
    Messages:
    5,482
    Likes Received:
    863
    You don't need a confidence boost, you urgently need help from someone experienced with youngsters.
     
    squidsin and Wally like this.
  7. SeeingSpots

    SeeingSpots Pugs, Ponies and Prosecco!

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2015
    Messages:
    921
    Likes Received:
    897
    It's hard to answer this without ou giving us any details. It sounds to me like you need to do a great deal of groundwork but would be helpful if you gave everyone a little background - What's your background with horses, how experienced you are, have you owned before, where you keep the horse, is it alone? In a herd? What's the horse's background? I know it's only 3 but good past? bad? What's it done up until now, what's it like in general etc
     
    Trewsers likes this.
  8. newforest

    newforest Opinion, a view not always based on knowledge.

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2008
    Messages:
    22,595
    Likes Received:
    6,908
    Correct it.
     
  9. Wally

    Wally Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2000
    Messages:
    35,235
    Likes Received:
    4,237
    Horses generally rear, though fear and uncertainty, it the horse who needs a confidence boost and that has to come from a laid back confident handler, if you don;t have the confidence to work with a frightened youngster hand it to someone who does before the horse is completely confused. Sorry if that sounds a bit harsh.
     
    Trewsers, carthorse and SeeingSpots like this.
  10. SeeingSpots

    SeeingSpots Pugs, Ponies and Prosecco!

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2015
    Messages:
    921
    Likes Received:
    897
    It doesn't sound harsh because it was right. You have to know when a horse is too much for you to deal with alone and either get the help you need, quickly before the horse gets worse or pass it to someone with enough experience to deal with. A nervous person with a horse that's frightened or has issues can be very dangerous. You have to know when you're not experienced enough and get help. That's what I did and I'm a million times more confident now. If I didn't have the help I'd have had to sell my pony though, he was too much for me alone.
     
The FREE site for selling smallholdings, farms and rural properties
Loading...

Share This Page