Dismiss Notice

Hi, we hope you enjoy looking around New Rider. We are a very friendly board so don't feel afraid to ask your questions. Register now, say 'Hello' and join in the conversations.

Dog training collars

Discussion in 'Cats, Dogs and other Animals' started by chunky monkey, Sep 20, 2015.

  1. Wally

    Wally Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2000
    Messages:
    35,235
    Likes Received:
    4,237
    I have used a shock collar on dogs who chase livestock. Only ever needed two zaps at most and the dogs became livestock friendly. It's that or get shot.
     
    Cortrasna and chev like this.
  2. chev

    chev Moderator

    Joined:
    May 7, 2002
    Messages:
    10,883
    Likes Received:
    1,197
    The farm where I helped when I kept my loan pony used a ewe with a lamb to put dogs off chasing stock. Once they'd been battered by an overprotective sheep hellbent on keeping her lamb safe once or twice they didn't try it again in a hurry.
     
    Wally likes this.
  3. Wally

    Wally Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2000
    Messages:
    35,235
    Likes Received:
    4,237
    we used to use a ram.
     
    chev likes this.
  4. Advert Guest Advertisement



    to hide this advert.
  5. KP nut

    KP nut I'd rather be riding.

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2008
    Messages:
    5,970
    Likes Received:
    4,906
    That's what my parents did too.
     
  6. eml

    eml Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2002
    Messages:
    12,707
    Likes Received:
    1,088
    When I first got Molly (Parsons ) she had been a working terrier and constantly went after any rabbit and down holes so we weer in danger of losing her. We tried the sort of collar that puffs lemon juice at them,with no success. It took several months of exercising her on a long lead and praising her for ignoring rabbit holes to suceed but she will now walk past any rabbit/ cat etc with no attempt to chase
     
    mystiquemalaika likes this.
  7. KP nut

    KP nut I'd rather be riding.

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2008
    Messages:
    5,970
    Likes Received:
    4,906
    Revisiting this thread... my sister's rescue lab has zero recall. Extensive reward based training has been totally ineffective. Thiz dog can be let into a garden and can look straight at the owner then run. They've spent £1000 on an 8 foot high fence but he still sometimes manages to get out. So he is on a lead all the time even at home. We are all staying with my mum at the moment and he's run away twice already out of her garden even with all of us and other dogs playing in the garden. He looked straight at owner who was 4 feet away then turned tail and disappeared over a gate for hours. We could see him romping all over fields miles away! Could get shot by a farmer, could get run over. Running off and chasing rabbits etc is just more rewarding to this dog than any reward we can come up with. Thoughts on a shock collar? - Used at the point the dog ignores the recall command and instead runs towards a gate/fence.
     
  8. CharliesAngel

    CharliesAngel Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2010
    Messages:
    1,070
    Likes Received:
    923
    A couple of questions.

    Do they have an enclosed run for him?
    Have they got him on a tether when outside?
    Have they paid to get a professional trainer in to help?
     
  9. KP nut

    KP nut I'd rather be riding.

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2008
    Messages:
    5,970
    Likes Received:
    4,906
    Yes to a tether and professional help. No to a run. They have just raised the fence which they thought would keep him in. They are now building it higher so he has freedom at home.
     
  10. KP nut

    KP nut I'd rather be riding.

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2008
    Messages:
    5,970
    Likes Received:
    4,906
    He was 11 months old when they got him. Sweetest, friendliest dog. Very affectionate. But zero recall when free outside. Recall good in the house and when on the tether.
     
  11. chunky monkey

    chunky monkey Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 2, 2007
    Messages:
    2,244
    Likes Received:
    408
    What about out walking. How many walks a day does the dog get. For how long.
    Watched Victoria Stillwell the other day. Dog in the park was on a 50 foot lead for training.
    If he's got recall on a tether. What about in the park. Have they taken him out on a long lead. Not one of those retractable ones. They are useless. It wants to be proper rope. Start off short distances with recall practice, then build up.
    I didn't buy a remote collar in the end. Someone i know brought one recently but they haven't used it on there's yet. I did read the instructions a few weeks ago, that came with it, as it seems you introduce it slowly over several weeks before you activate it on the dog. Waiting to see if they set it up on there's how effective it is.
     
  12. KP nut

    KP nut I'd rather be riding.

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2008
    Messages:
    5,970
    Likes Received:
    4,906
    He is walked daily 1- 2 hours. They also teach him lots of tricks/games they can play indoors to keep his mind occupied. If he's on a tether or retractable lead he comes back. They did a recall training programme with him where he got treats and sometimes 'jackpot' treats. But the moment he knows he is free he runs off immediately. He always comes back - but on his terms. They'll be out hunting for him and come home to find him waiting on the doorstep. He is 3 now and has not improved one jot since they have had him. I hate the idea of a shock collar but we seem to be in last resort city now. Or he will just never be allowed any freedom and is always at risk if he gets away. They've got young kids who have been running in and out of the garden today and he slipped out AGAIN! I've never know a dog like this! Poor recall yes but not total disregard for recall and constant persistent efforts to escape.
     
  13. CharliesAngel

    CharliesAngel Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2010
    Messages:
    1,070
    Likes Received:
    923
    Ok, I wouldn’t go with a collar. I did run behavioural clinics and training classes for many years so I do have some experience. If they were asking me for advice based on the info you have given me I would be looking to specifically go to a gundog trainer. Sometimes reward based training such as you have described doesn’t work - the jackpot is not enough and the reward from the thrill of bunny-chasing always wins. They sound like they do need professional help but the RIGHT professional is absolutely key. PM me the area if you want and I will ask about for contacts. A gundog train ‘may’ use a collar of sorts but it’s my opinion only a professional should do so. They may end up sending the dog away for training.
     
  14. SeeingSpots

    SeeingSpots Pugs, Ponies and Prosecco!

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2015
    Messages:
    921
    Likes Received:
    897
    Can vouch for this although we used to throw a chain on the floor. The noise would shock the dog into stopping whatever behaviour it was doing.
     
  15. SeeingSpots

    SeeingSpots Pugs, Ponies and Prosecco!

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2015
    Messages:
    921
    Likes Received:
    897
    Although reading this now don't think it would work for snappiness. My male is dog aggressive at times and we took him to a one to one trainer but he can still be funny. Sorry, not being much help I know. Interested to see the replies though as I have had issues with mine.
     
  16. misty

    misty Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2016
    Messages:
    296
    Likes Received:
    159
    I use mainly reward based training but also used a Citronella spray collar with my largest dog. The reason for this, and it was based on advice from my trainer, is that he responds very well to spray if he begins to get a bit frantic. And when he sees another dog, he can start to wind himself up. We got it for camping as quite often when we're in the motorhome, dogs can be walking past all the time and he gets himself really wound up. What I liked is that ours had 3 buttons: warning beep, short spray and long spray. Now, most of the time, the warning beep is enough to snap him out of it because he knows what will follow if he carries on. I did find it quite effective. And then I ended up transferring it across to my BC who has no particular behavioural issues except that she eats poo - other dogs is a speciality. I was worried about her getting worms so tried her with a muzzle but she just stuck the muzzle in the poo so every walk I had a poo covered muzzle to deal with! Eurgh! Anyway, as with my bigger dog, I found that the beep tends to be enough to think "don't do that or I know what will happen!" It's weird because, in terms of reward based training - she values poo over any treat I have tried! So she's self rewarding her bad behaviour. Disgusting dog! Yuck! haha.
     
  17. popularfurball

    popularfurball Learning all the time

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2005
    Messages:
    12,736
    Likes Received:
    667
    I would be concerned that the shock would actually deter him from returning - he will associate the recall cue with something unpleasant. Sorry, I'm a toughie on recall - if they don't come back without fail, they don't come off lead. There is a specific criminal offence for having a dog dangerously out of control.

    That said, my own dog has very little recall! We had a custom 70ft line made from him at a ropemakers in North Yorkshire and we do regular recall work with him. Unfortunately due to his dog-angst issues I don't think I could ever trust him off lead and his recall is unlikely to be good enough either
     
    Ruskii likes this.
The FREE site for selling smallholdings, farms and rural properties
Loading...

Share This Page