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Actually owning a horse.

Discussion in 'Confidence Club' started by BlanketSpot, Sep 15, 2017.

  1. BlanketSpot

    BlanketSpot New Member

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    Hi all! New to the forum but not new to equestrianism. I've been riding for a large portion of my life and take lessons weekly. My reason for this post is to learn from other's advice. Even though I've been riding since childhood, I don't come from a horsey background and now I'm looking to buy my own. I'm desperate for my own however the thought of buying one and bringing it home is filling me with anxiety! I'm worrying about every little thing so I hope there some words of wisdom and experience that can be bestowed to put my mind at ease.
     
  2. chunky monkey

    chunky monkey Well-Known Member

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    Buy the right one. That's easier said than done.

    If your not sure about owning why not take something on a long term loan. Or loan with a view to buy. You treat it like your own (paying all the costs, insurance etc ) but if you find it doesn't work out you can send it back.

    Or is it the general getting into a routine you have to go and check the horse daily etc that bothers you. Could you not try a share for a couple of days a week with someone.
     
  3. tiamaria lady

    tiamaria lady Active Member

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    Hi blanketspot. Welcome :)
    I was the same only i only rode when I was a child and that was for a few weeks in a riding school. I took it back up in my mid twenties and from there the history is too long to put into a reply :D:D
    Basically dove in at the wrong end and my confidence is gone forever 10 yrs on!! So defo buy the one that feels right!!! Take your time.
    I bought a very unsuitable horse that wrecked my nerves for good. :( the second time round I took on a loan mare that got my confidence back but if i had of bought her I'd be in trouble too as she was not so good at the jumping lark :rolleyes: the bottom line is first of all make sure you take your time and remember that the seller will tell you anything to sell! Ask for trials if possible or go try it a few times. Keep in mind that it may be lunged to the last to tire it out before you ride or even doped. So defo ask your instructor to go with.
    The ownership part will all fall into place and you'll love it! ;) and there's always here to ask too for advice.
     
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  5. Trewsers

    Trewsers Well-Known Member

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    Hello
    I think if I had analysed ownership too much I'd never have bought one. There's never a right time but one thing I will say no matter what, make sure you have back up and help on hand if you need it. A good teacher is great for helping your confidence when they first need settling in. A good knowledgeable livery yard is also a must. Of course you don't have to listen to "every" piece of advice you're given, cos we all know everyone has advice and it's not always the right type. Read as much as you can - soak it all up and as already said, try and find the right one - never be tempted to rush into something just because you feel it's "time" . The right one will be out there. Good luck anyways.
     
  6. BlanketSpot

    BlanketSpot New Member

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    Thanks all for the replies! I feel a bit more at ease. I would loan if there was anything to loan in my area! But I feel a bit more confident now in my search - so it looks like I'll keep looking for 'the one'. Thanks again :)
     
  7. Jessey

    Jessey Well-Known Member

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    I agree don't settle, write yourself a list of must have attributes and when looking be honest with yourself about if the horse actually meets those, if it doesn't check every box its not the right one, I think this is far more important with a first horse :)
     
  8. BlanketSpot

    BlanketSpot New Member

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    Hi again all. Didn’t really want to start a new thread on the same subject but I was wondering how people manage their horse time and work? I have a part time job at the moment and it’s mainly evenings so doing horse stuff during the day should be quite simple right? Still haven’t found ‘the one’ yet
     
  9. GaryB

    GaryB Well-Known Member

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    I have Harvey on part livery. I did the calculations and found it worked out more or less the same cost as DIY after I factored in fuel costs and having to pay for assistance some of the time.
     
  10. Jessey

    Jessey Well-Known Member

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    I keep my guys at a property I rent, so I maintain it myself. I work about 45 hours a week normally, sometimes more, and make time to do my guys before and after work. I don't have a family so having to rush home isn't a worry for me :)

    They are out 24/7 with access to a barn and the bare minimum time I can spend to meet their basic needs is 25 minutes a day in summer and 45 minutes a day in winter, but I can't do that day after day, only when I plan for it. I probably spend a minimum of 1 hour per night and at least 1/2 a day at the weekend, so 12 hours a week just looking after the horses/property, riding time is in addition to that. I also have to arrange for someone to go in if I can't be there.

    Obviously I could spend less time if they were on DIY or part/full livery where the property maintenance and/or care is done for you, but the cost of that is appropriately higher and for me its all about my horses needs and location, Jess can't have a lot of grass but also doesn't stable well and they are 2 mins walk from my house where they are.

    Thinking back, when I had horses stabled on DIY, they would take me about 20 mins to check/fly spray in summer and at least an hour a day to muck out/bring in or out etc. in winter, plus those odd jobs you still have to do like pulling out rubber mats and having a good clean once in a while etc. plus you have the travel time to get there and back.

    I don't find it hard to manage, but non-horsey friends and family often don't understand when I can't go to XXX day out because I need to be back for the horses or can't have a holiday because I can't get anyone to do them for me.
     
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  11. Trewsers

    Trewsers Well-Known Member

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    Yes people often don't understand why we don't go on holiday. We do visit relatives down south but normally only for one or two nights max. Can't leave my babies no matter how lovely my friend is who looks after them - I get withdrawal symptoms:oops::D they are well looked after in my absence but two do have special needs, so not fair leaving them a full week.
     
  12. eventerbabe

    eventerbabe Well-Known Member

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    I like the advice about getting the right horse. Don't rush things, and don't be rushed by sellers either. Be realistic about what you want, your own capabilities and your ambitions. I fit in 3 horses (a feisty veteran, my 13 yr old ridden horse and a 3 year old unbacked youngster) around a very demanding head of faculty teaching job. It's hard work. I'm up at 5 and quite frequently am simply too tired to ride after work. I'm lucky I have mine at home and don't have the added stress/drama of a livery yard. I am very lucky to have a horsey mum and a husband who I have trained in most aspects of horse care so I have some back up. For example yesterday I was very late home due to a parents' night so hubby had the horses in and fed by the time I got home.

    My final advice would be listen to the right people. The horse world is full of "experts". Be selective on who you are guided by.
     
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  13. 3QuarterClyde

    3QuarterClyde New Member

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    I agree with all that has been said. I think it's super important that with your first foray into ownership you get a horse that has nice manners on the ground. If you've lost all your confidence trying to manage a pushy uncooperative pony on the ground, it is gonna be bad news by the time you climb on board.
    I made a huge mistake purchasing a horse (my 3rd by then) who by all accounts should have been ideal, but when I had him at my place he was a complete nut job. Just moving him between paddocks was terrifying. He had been gelded late and the owner was less than honest about his vices.
    He was the extreme bad example, but if I had never owned my sweet silly tb first I would have never looked for another horse again after the negative experience.

    I was 30 when I bought my first horse, had only been taking lessons for a few years around having my kids. Find a nice horse and you can muddle through it together
     
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